2011 June Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada

Chapter 5—National Police Services—Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Main Points

Introduction

Overview of national police services
What we found in our previous audits
Focus of the audit

Observations and Recommendations

Governing national police services

National police services are not covered by formal agreements
National police services governance lacks partners’ representation

Funding national police services

The RCMP has not determined the detailed transaction costs of each of its national police services
Resources for national police services have not kept pace with growing service requests

Delivering national police services

Timely response remains a challenge despite improvements

Conclusion

About the Audit

Appendix—List of recommendations

Exhibits:

5.1—National police services provided over the years by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

5.2—Progress in addressing our recommendation on national police services agreements

5.3—Several national police services have no partner advisory body

5.4—Progress in addressing our recommendations on advisory committee and client consultation

5.5—Progress in addressing our recommendation on a review of Forensic Laboratory Services

5.6—The National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative is not yet completed

5.7—RCMP spending on policing support services, including national police services, has exceeded allocated funding for the last five fiscal years

5.8—The DNA sample identification process involves the National DNA Data Bank and the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services

5.9—Criminal record update backlog has more than quadrupled since the 2005–06 fiscal year

5.10—Progress in addressing our recommendations on the Real Time Identification project

5.11—Client service requests continue to increase

Main Points

What we examined

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) provides Canada’s law enforcement community with specialized national police services such as forensic analyses of criminal evidence, criminal records information, identification services, technological support, learning opportunities, and the collection and analysis of criminal information and intelligence.

This follow-up audit assessed the progress that the federal government and the RCMP have made toward keeping commitments to improve certain national police services, including their timeliness, made in response to our audits in 2000, 2004, and 2007; those audits noted significant delays in the delivery of these services. We focused on four of the national police services: Forensic Laboratory Services, the National DNA Data Bank, Criminal Intelligence Service Canada, and Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services. The DNA Data Bank has not been the subject of a previous audit by this office.

We also followed up on previous audit observations concerning the governance of national police services as a whole and the approach to funding them.

Audit work for this chapter was substantially completed on 1 November 2010.

Why it’s important

Jurisdictional limits on individual police forces, the division of investigative responsibility when crime crosses these jurisdictional lines, and constraints on funds and manpower limit the ability of any single police force to carry out complex investigations. Given the RCMP’s federal and contractual policing responsibilities, provincial and municipal police forces often rely on the RCMP to provide highly specialized police support services. The aim of providing national police services is to enable and sustain uniform access to information that supports public safety and the administration of justice to all Canadians, particularly where such services may not be within the resources of individual jurisdictions.

What we found

  • The federal government and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police have made unsatisfactory progress on commitments made in response to recommendations in our 2000, 2004, and 2007 reports regarding national police services. The RCMP is still providing national police services to other levels of government and law enforcement organizations without clarifying which services should be provided; how they should be funded; and how provincial, territorial, and municipal partners should be engaged within the national police services governance framework. In the absence of formal agreements, the accountability of the RCMP and other partners for the delivery of these services has not been clearly established, nor has how they are to be sustained over the long term.
  • The RCMP has not determined the detailed transactional costs of providing each of its national police services. Accurate costing information is essential to efficiently manage services and resources. In addition, because of financial pressures, the RCMP is finding it difficult to deliver national police services and also fulfill its other obligations. In light of existing resource constraints, it is difficult without adequate cost information to negotiate agreements on which national police services will be provided and which are priorities.
  • While changes in the approach to managing Forensic Laboratory Services have increased the RCMP’s focus on clients’ needs and reduced turnaround times, other services have not shown similar improvement. For example, backlogs and delays in updating criminal record information have significantly increased—from 5 months in 2000 to 14 months today. In addition, technological upgrades to critical systems requiring significant investments are facing challenges or have been delayed. At the same time, the demand for national police services is growing and straining the RCMP’s ability to deliver in a timely way.

The RCMP and Public Safety Canada have responded. The RCMP and Public Safety Canada agree with all of the recommendations. Their detailed responses follow the recommendations throughout the chapter.

Introduction

5.1 Under the Constitution, the provincial and federal governments share responsibility for the criminal justice system. Parliament has legislative authority for establishing criminal law and criminal procedures. Provinces have primary responsibility for enforcing the Criminal Code, prosecuting criminal charges, and administering the trial courts. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) contributes to national policing by providing three types of services. First, it provides federal policing by enforcing federal laws dealing with a variety of subjects such as organized crime and border security. Second, it provides contracted police services to all provinces and territories, except Quebec and Ontario, which each have their own provincial police force, and to certain municipalities and First Nations communities. Third, it provides support services to police forces across the country, such as forensic analyses of criminal evidence. These national support services for policing are the focus of this audit.

5.2 The RCMP is part of the Public Safety Canada portfolio, reporting to the Minister. Public Safety Canada contributes to the development of law enforcement policies and programs and provides advice and support to the Minister in matters regarding the RCMP. Public Safety Canada also represents the federal government in negotiating police service agreements and leads collaborative efforts to modernize the management, governance, and review of the RCMP.

5.3 The RCMP has a wide range of responsibilities. Through federal policing and through its various policing contracts with provinces and municipalities, the RCMP has jurisdictions and personnel that span all of Canada. This benefits all Canadians when dealing with crime that extends beyond any single jurisdiction or beyond the means of an individual police force. As we indicated in our November 2005 chapter on contract policing, these contracts enable the RCMP to act as a national police force, even though it is not mandated to do so, providing policing at all levels (municipal, provincial, national, international, and Aboriginal). With the approval of the federal government, the RCMP can provide specialized police support not only to the law enforcement community, but also to international events held in Canada, such as the Vancouver Olympics and the G-8 and G-20 summits.

Overview of national police services

5.4 The RCMP delivers a number of national police services—specialized investigational support services that assist Canada’s law enforcement community—such as

  • forensic analyses of criminal evidence,
  • criminal records information,
  • identification services,
  • technological support,
  • the Canadian Police College, and
  • the collection and analysis of criminal information and intelligence.

5.5 The RCMP has been delivering such specialized services for more than a century. For example, it has provided fingerprint identification and centralized upkeep of criminal records since 1908 and has provided criminal investigation support to the provinces since 1937. Although initially designed and funded to support RCMP members, these services were later made available to other forces and the criminal justice system in provinces and municipalities.

5.6 In 1965, the federal and provincial governments agreed that the fight against the growing presence of organized crime would require increased cooperation among various jurisdictions as well as extensive additional specialized technological support and resources beyond the means of any one police force in Canada. Following a 1965 Cabinet decision and the 1966 Federal–Provincial Conference of Attorneys General on Organized Crime, the RCMP delivered new specialized services to support policing to Canada’s law enforcement community. These new services included the formation of Criminal Intelligence Service Canada, the Canadian Police College, and the Canadian Police Information Centre, as well as the expansion of the RCMP’s criminal record and fingerprint repositories and its Forensic Laboratory Services. These additions and expansions represented an initial federal government investment of $13.6 million over five years starting in 1966.

5.7 Since 1966, the RCMP has also been tasked with additional specialized services, including

  • the Canadian Bomb Data Centre,
  • the Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System,
  • the National DNA Data Bank,
  • the Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children,
  • the National Sex Offender Registry, and
  • the Canadian Firearms Program.

Exhibit 5.1 briefly describes these services.

Exhibit 5.1—National police services provided over the years by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Services Description Established
Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services Maintains the national repository of fingerprint and criminal record information. 1908
Forensic Laboratory Services Provides forensic analysis services relating to criminal cases in biology, toxicology, firearms, trace evidence, and counterfeit and document examinations. 1937
Canadian Police College Provides specialized and advanced police sciences and leadership training to foreign and Canadian senior police officers. 1966
Canadian Police Information Centre Serves as a central repository that provides information on crimes and criminals. 1966
Criminal Intelligence Service Canada Facilitates the production and exchange of criminal information and intelligence. 1970
Canadian Bomb Data Centre Provides support and information in combatting the illegal use of explosives. 1972
Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System Serves as a central repository that provides information on serial criminals and violent crimes. 1991
National DNA Data Bank Serves as a central repository that captures and references DNA profiles from crime scenes and convicted offenders. 2000
Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children Provides investigative assistance to help reduce the vulnerability and exploitation of children. 2004
National Sex Offender Registry Serves as a central repository that provides current information about convicted sex offenders. 2004
Canadian Firearms Program Provides operational support to the prevention and investigation of firearms crime and misuse. Transferred to RCMP in 2006
Source: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

5.8 These services depend on the commitment of provinces and municipalities to input and share criminal information, as well as on federal financial support.

5.9 Partners—members of Canada’s law enforcement community that use or have input into national police services—have recognized the benefit of a central national repository and coordination of criminal information and investigational support activities. By providing these specialized training, technological, and scientific services, the RCMP enables uniform access to information that supports the administration of justice to all Canadians, particularly where the same level of services may not be within the resources of a given province or territory.

5.10 In the 2010–11 fiscal year, the RCMP allocated $527 million to these specialized policing services, including 3,260 full-time personnel out of a total RCMP staff of 29,840.

What we found in our previous audits

5.11 In our April 2000 chapter on services for Canada’s law enforcement community, we reported on several issues regarding governance, funding, and timeliness of national police services and recommended that the government reach agreements with all partners on required services, funding arrangements, structure, and accountability.

5.12 In our May 2007 chapter on the management of forensic laboratory services, we found that the RCMP’s Forensic Laboratory Services was not meeting turnaround targets in the delivery of its services and that clients lacked the opportunity to influence operations.

5.13 Finally, our previous audits found a backlog of fingerprints awaiting processing and identification. In our March 2004 chapter on national security, we recommended that the RCMP find and implement a solution to deal with its fingerprint backlog. In our follow-up chapter in March 2009, we found that progress on the development of the RCMP’s proposed solution, the Real Time Identification project, was satisfactory, but a backlog remained in updating individuals’ criminal record information.

Focus of the audit

5.14 This follow-up audit assessed the progress that the federal government and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police have made against issues related to our recommendations from Chapter 7 of our April 2000 Report, Chapter 3 of our March 2004 Report, and Chapter 7 of our May 2007 Report. We also assessed progress against other audit observations on the governance and funding of national police services found in the preceding chapters, and on the status of the Real Time Identification project outlined in Chapter 1 of our March 2009 Status Report.

5.15 We included Public Safety Canada in this audit because it is responsible for developing policing policy at the federal level. Public Safety Canada represents the federal government in negotiating police services agreements and provides advice and support to the Minister in matters regarding the RCMP.

5.16 More information on the audit objectives, scope, approach, and criteria can be found in About the Audit at the end of this chapter.

Observations and Recommendations

Governing national police services

National police services are not covered by formal agreements

5.17 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is required by legislation to provide some policing support services, such as the Canadian Firearms Program, Forensic Laboratory Services, the National DNA Data Bank, and the National Sex Offender Registry. However, there are other national police services being provided by the RCMP that are not legislated but were requested by the federal government, because these services support essential policing activities for the RCMP’s members and for the law enforcement community in general. These include the Canadian Bomb Data Centre, the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services, the Canadian Police College, the Canadian Police Information Centre, Criminal Intelligence Service Canada, and the Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System. These services are also important because central collection and exchange of critical criminal information and intelligence beyond existing jurisdictions enhances the security of all Canadians. Partners recognize that the RCMP is well positioned to provide these services given its federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal policing experience.

5.18 The proposal to expand national police services was discussed at the 1966 Federal–Provincial Conference of Attorneys General on Organized Crime and confirmed and implemented through subsequent Treasury Board decisions, but it was not formalized through agreements or a governance framework between the federal and provincial governments. Since then, national police services have continued to expand in response to the increasing scope and influence of criminal activity across national and provincial boundaries as well as to rapidly changing advancements in technology that support police. Today, approximately 70 percent of national police services are being accessed by police forces other than the RCMP. Even though the RCMP uses approximately 30 percent of national police services, it is currently assuming most of the costs of these services. Further, there are still no agreements on what services will be provided. We found that the RCMP’s role, responsibility, and accountabilities have not been clearly defined for the following:

  • deciding which national police services should be provided to other police forces;
  • deciding how these services should be funded; and
  • determining how provincial, territorial, and municipal partners should be consulted.

5.19 We also found that the absence of formal agreements for national police services creates uncertainties regarding the role of partners. In most instances, there is no obligation on any police force under provincial jurisdiction to provide or share criminal information.

5.20 In our 2000 chapter, we recommended that the government reach agreements with all partners on national police services, funding arrangements, structure, and accountability, to which the RCMP concurred. We examined whether such agreements were in place. Since that time, the provinces and the federal government have signed the biology casework analysis agreements. However, we have assessed progress as unsatisfactory because the government has not reached agreements on any other national police services (Exhibit 5.2).

Exhibit 5.2—Progress in addressing our recommendation on national police services agreements

Recommendation Progress
The government should ensure that agreement is reached with all stakeholders on the national services needed, funding arrangements, structure and accountability.

(Recommendation 7.123 of the 2000 April Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7, Royal Canadian Mounted Police—Services for Canada’s Law Enforcement Community)

Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory—Progress is satisfactory, given the significance and complexity of the issue, and the time that has elapsed since the recommendation was made.

Unsatisfactory—Progress is unsatisfactory, given the significance and complexity of the issue, and the time that has elapsed since the recommendation was made.

5.21 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act provides the Minister of Public Safety with the authority to enter into arrangements with provinces and municipalities regarding the use of RCMP services. Public Safety Canada is responsible for leading efforts to develop policing policy and federal–provincial policing agreements. Recently, the RCMP and Public Safety Canada have initiated discussions to address the lack of clarity of the roles and responsibilities of the RCMP and partners for national police services. Federal, provincial, and territorial assistant deputy ministers responsible for policing have met to discuss the issue.

5.22 We recognize that any agreement on national police services will require effort and time on the part of Public Safety Canada, the RCMP, and provincial and territorial representatives. But such agreements could clarify the roles and responsibilities of all partners for the delivery of national police services to best serve the needs of the criminal justice system.

5.23 Recommendation. Public Safety Canada, in consultation with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, should work with partners to identify what national police services are required; to examine issues related to governance, accountability, and funding of national police services; and to propose a way forward for implementation.

Public Safety Canada’s and the RCMP’s response. Agreed. Public Safety and the RCMP recognize that, due to the complexity of this issue, a long-term, concerted effort will be required, starting with the study, “A Feasible and Sustainable Model for Forensic Services Delivery in Canada,” commissioned by Public Safety Canada. It is further recognized that, in order to sustain national police services in the future, agreement needs to be reached with partners on what services are required, and that issues related to governance, accountability, and funding need to be addressed. These issues are directly linked to the significant work required to address the other recommendations within this audit, including

  • identifying the services offered as part of national police services;
  • undertaking an analysis that includes cost to deliver the services; what has been funded; cost recovery efforts to identify gaps; the governance structure, which would include the ongoing study on alternative service delivery models and the RCMP’s strategic discussion paper, and consultation with the provinces and territories;
  • developing options and outlining next steps for consideration by the government; and
  • negotiating funding arrangements with partners.

Overlapping with this study would be the RCMP’s National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative that is intended to provide an overall view of the delivery of national police services.

National police services governance lacks partners’ representation

5.24 During the Federal–Provincial Conference of Attorneys General on Organized Crime in 1966, the provinces suggested that representatives from different jurisdictions facilitate the exchange of information among organizations to avoid national police services becoming exclusively an RCMP operation. Representatives were chosen in 1969 for the Advisory Committee for the Canadian Police Information Centre to allow the larger law enforcement bodies to participate in the decisions made regarding the centre.

5.25 In 2000, we noted that because Forensic Laboratory Services are used by other members of the Canadian law enforcement community who rely on these services, we recommended the establishment of a national forensic advisory committee. In our 2007 chapter, we also recommended the establishment of a mechanism for consulting with partners so they have an opportunity to influence laboratory services, priorities, and service standards. The RCMP has implemented these recommendations.

5.26 However, as noted in Exhibit 5.3, we found that several of the other national police services still have no advisory body. Further, some advisory bodies meet irregularly. Advisory bodies allow partners to influence decisions and participate in the development of the services’ policies. For example, when the Canadian Police Information Centre advisory board was first established in 1969, the federal government intended that through this participation, other partners from the law enforcement community would feel a direct responsibility to contribute, maintain, and use these services.

Exhibit 5.3—Several national police services have no partner advisory body

Services Partner Advisory Body
Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services No committee
Forensic Laboratory Services Advisory committee
Canadian Police College Advisory board
Canadian Police Information Centre Advisory committee
Criminal Intelligence Service Canada National Executive Committee (also has decision-making authority)
Canadian Bomb Data Centre No committee
Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System No committee
National DNA Data Bank National Advisory Committee
Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children No committee
National Sex Offender Registry No committee
Canadian Firearms Program Advisory board
National police services (general) National Police Services Advisory Council

5.27 Following our 2000 chapter, the RCMP established a National Police Services Advisory Council whose mission is to provide strategic-level advice to the RCMP for all national police services. It consists of executive-level members drawn from the public, private, and professional sectors with extensive management and federal government expertise. Each member is named by the Commissioner of the RCMP for a period of three years. Although it met irregularly in the past, it has now been meeting regularly, as intended.

5.28 We found, however, that the advisory council’s terms of reference do not require partner representation. While there are benefits derived from the current composition of the council, adding representation from Canada’s law enforcement community would also promote a direct responsibility to contribute, maintain, and use these services, in line with the intent of the 1966 conference. Overall, we found progress to be satisfactory in addressing our recommendations on advisory committee and client consultation (Exhibit 5.4). However, in our opinion, the RCMP can improve partner representation on several of its national police services advisory bodies.

Exhibit 5.4—Progress in addressing our recommendations on advisory committee and client consultation

Recommendation Progress
The RCMP should establish a national forensic advisory committee.

(Recommendation 7.42 of the 2000 April Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7, Royal Canadian Mounted Police—Services for Canada’s Law Enforcement Community)

Satisfactory
The RCMP should establish a mechanism for consulting with clients so that they have an opportunity to influence lab services, priorities, and service standards.

(Recommendation 7.79 of the 2007 May Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7, Management of Forensic Laboratory Services—Royal Canadian Mounted Police)

Satisfactory
Satisfactory—Progress is satisfactory, given the significance and complexity of the issue, and the time that has elapsed since the recommendation was made.

Unsatisfactory—Progress is unsatisfactory, given the significance and complexity of the issue, and the time that has elapsed since the recommendation was made.

5.29 Recommendation. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police should ensure partner representation in all national police services that best meets the needs of the users of these services.

The RCMP’s response. Agreed. The RCMP agrees that partner representation is important in all national police services in order to best meet the needs of the users of these services. A strategic discussion paper is expected to be completed by the end of the 2010–11 fiscal year, as part of the National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative. This initiative will examine the existing national police service governance structure to understand the current situation and articulate viable options for delivery of the services. The intended outcome of this activity is to ensure better partner representation in the national police services governance structure, allowing national police services to best meet their users’ needs.

Funding national police services

The RCMP has not determined the detailed transaction costs of each of its national police services

5.30 In order to properly manage its resources, negotiate agreements on funding arrangements with partners, and explore options for different delivery models, the RCMP needs to be able to determine the detailed transactional costs of each of its national police services. Accurate costing information is an essential element in designing, providing, and managing services in an efficient manner. Determining these costs would also assist the RCMP in defining its requirements in order to meet future increases in service volumes. We examined whether the RCMP had determined the detailed transactional costs of each of its national police services.

5.31 As early as 1997, as the RCMP was examining various options for the funding of national police services, it recognized that any discussions of cost-sharing or cost recovery would require details regarding service standards and service costs. In particular, accurate transaction costs are needed for any negotiations on cost recovery. Since then, the RCMP has led or participated in a number of studies aimed at determining the costing of national police services, including the contributions of partners to these services.

5.32 In one such instance, biology casework analysis agreements that came into force in 2001 stipulated that participating provinces would pay 55 percent of the average national RCMP cost per biology case for designated offences as determined by a costing analysis performed for the Solicitor General of Canada. However, we found that revised agreements signed in 2007 were not based on the cost per biology case. These agreements provided only a fixed amount to be paid by provinces receiving these services. Public Safety Canada told us that the existing funding arrangement for these agreements does not reflect the actual costs of biology case service requests today.

5.33 We examined the cost per biology service request prepared by the RCMP but found that the costs were underestimated because the calculations did not include all of the work performed. Therefore, the RCMP cannot provide information on the actual costs it is incurring to provide this service to other police forces.

5.34 In response to our 2007 chapter recommendation regarding a review of the Forensic Laboratory Services, the RCMP agreed that it should perform a cost–benefit analysis for these services. Although the RCMP performed a review of Forensic Laboratory Services in 2009, it did not include a cost–benefit analysis. However, the review recommended that each element of the RCMP’s biology services’ business be costed, starting at the gross unit level and then moving down to individual sites and processes. This had not yet been done at the time of our audit, resulting in an unsatisfactory progress rating (Exhibit 5.5). In determining progress as being unsatisfactory, we looked only at whether the RCMP performed a cost–benefit analysis of various services.

Exhibit 5.5—Progress in addressing our recommendation on a review of Forensic Laboratory Services

Recommendation Progress
The RCMP should conduct a review of the Forensic Laboratory Services to examine internal efficiencies, perform a cost/benefit analysis of various services, and examine the need for additional resources.

(Recommendation 7.50 of the 2007 May Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7, Management of Forensic Laboratory Services—Royal Canadian Mounted Police)

Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory—Progress is satisfactory, given the significance and complexity of the issue, and the time that has elapsed since the recommendation was made.

Unsatisfactory—Progress is unsatisfactory, given the significance and complexity of the issue, and the time that has elapsed since the recommendation was made.

5.35 At the time of this audit, we found that the RCMP could not provide detailed transactional costs of its national police services, which limits its ability to properly manage its resources. The National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative (Exhibit 5.6) currently under way is expected to provide information on these costs, but it is to be completed during the 2011–12 fiscal year.

Exhibit 5.6—The National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative is not yet completed

The National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative is a project that examines national police services. The project is designed to reaffirm the services’ identity and mandate, provide a complete financial and program overview, and provide a thorough analysis of potential strategies to optimize current systems and to develop new funding mechanisms for national police services in the future. Project results are to be prepared and submitted within the 2011–12 fiscal year. The project includes the following objectives:

  • Review and validate the mandate of national police services.
  • Review and validate the selection of services.
  • Compare historical demands with current operational capacity and quantify the resource gap.
  • Conduct a rigorous financial review of national police services.
  • Review the governance and accountability structure for national police services.
  • Develop and analyze potential mechanisms to provide dedicated and sustainable funding for national police services.

Source: Adapted from the project charter of the National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative

5.36 Recommendation. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police should complete as scheduled its National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Project, including a detailed estimate of its transactional costs to provide each national police service, and monitor these costs over time.

The RCMP’s response. Agreed. The RCMP agrees that it should complete the National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative, which is currently continuing as planned. One of the intended outcomes of the National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative is to allow the RCMP to build a more robust and accurate method of costing of services. As well, a strategic national police services discussion paper, to be finished within the 2010–11 fiscal year, will include a review of national police services and their challenges, an articulation of potential options for governance and service delivery models, and recommendations for a long-term strategic vision. The discussion paper will be used as a vehicle to engage partner agencies in discussions concerning the future of national police services.

Resources for national police services have not kept pace with growing service requests

5.37 Since the 1966 federal–provincial conference, national police services have expanded, the number of service requests has increased, and the services have also become reliant on the use of increasingly complex information systems requiring substantial investments. All of these factors have contributed to the growing cost of delivering national police services. We examined whether the RCMP was allocating necessary resources to meet the needs of all national police services.

5.38 As early as 1992, the RCMP recognized that there was an increasing gap between its available resources and the cost of delivering national police services to Canada’s law enforcement community. As shown in Exhibit 5.7, policing support service expenses, which include national police services, exceeded allocations for the last five fiscal years, reaching a gap of $97.5 million for the 2008–09 fiscal year.

Exhibit 5.7—RCMP spending on policing support services, including national police services, has exceeded allocated funding for the last five fiscal years

RCMP spending on policing support services, including national police services

[text version]

Source: Main Estimates and Public Accounts of Canada

5.39 To alleviate these financial pressures, we found that the RCMP has, over the past five years, been using unspent portions of its budget from preceding fiscal years to ease financial gaps for national police services in subsequent years. In previous years, the main source of these funds has been from less than expected spending on new recruits.

5.40 However, we found that the successful recruitment of police officers for contract and federal policing has reduced the carry-forward of unspent funds. This has reduced the RCMP’s flexibility to reallocate resources to resolve funding pressures such as those in national police services. To compensate, for the 2009–10 fiscal year, the RCMP reduced the initial budgets for all its programs by five percent, with the exception of funds earmarked for contract policing and the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, and reallocated those funds mostly to national police services. For the 2010–11 fiscal year, the RCMP reduced the initial budgets for its programs by 10.4 percent to cover funding gaps, including national police services.

5.41 The internal reallocation increased available funding for national police services while other RCMP programs, primarily federal policing, had to cut back. In particular, the RCMP’s Federal and International Operations Directorate—which has responsibility for organized crime investigations, border integrity, drug enforcement, and money laundering—has had to reduce its budget by more than $47.7 million or 8.4 percent in the 2010–11 fiscal year.

5.42 The RCMP finds that it is becoming increasingly difficult to continue funding the rising costs of providing national police services through internal reallocation. In order to balance its resources and without additional funding, officials have told us that the RCMP must either reduce these services or permanently redirect funding from other RCMP programs and activities to sustain national police services.

5.43 We found that the RCMP is developing a comprehensive reallocation strategy to assess existing pressures and then identify opportunities to permanently reallocate resources to the highest priority pressures. Senior officials told us that this review will be followed by decisions that could include the termination of programs that are not a legal obligation of the RCMP, including some national police services.

5.44 However, the development and successful implementation of this strategy, or any other approach to dealing with funding shortfalls, first requires a clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the RCMP and its partners in deciding which national police services should be provided and how they should be delivered.

5.45 The RCMP’s past readiness to take on the delivery of additional national police services is a demonstration of its commitment to deliver services that are needed for policing. But, as funding pressures indicate, there are limits to the RCMP’s capacity. In its December 2007 report, the Task Force on Governance and Cultural Change in the RCMP, appointed by the federal government to advise on strengthening the governance of the RCMP, recommended, “The RCMP should implement measures to ensure that no commitment to deliver a new service or modify an existing service is made without assurance that the necessary human resources and equipment can be deployed without compromising the ability of the Force to fulfill its existing responsibilities . . . ”.

5.46 Another example of a funding challenge is the National DNA Data Bank. The DNA Identification Act came into force in 2000, requiring the RCMP to provide services for the DNA Data Bank without additional permanent resources. With the coming into force of amendments to the Act, the number of service requests to the National DNA Data Bank has more than doubled, from around 19,800 in the 2007–08 fiscal year to approximately 40,800 in the 2008–09 fiscal year. The RCMP has made internal reallocations to make resources available for the National DNA Data Bank.

5.47 In Budget 2010, the federal government announced that it would explore options for different delivery models of the RCMP’s Forensic Laboratory Services, including privatization. It believes, “A new approach should improve the timeliness of processing samples, ensure sound financial administration and increase research and development in forensic science.” A study of these options is currently being planned by Public Safety Canada as lead in the federal government’s efforts to modernize the management, governance, and review of the RCMP. The preliminary results of this study are anticipated in late 2011.

5.48 However, the study does not include all national police services, only the Forensic Laboratory Services. Considering the RCMP’s ongoing efforts to clarify its national police service roles and responsibilities and to solve current funding shortfalls, a study of all national police services to explore options for different delivery models may provide guidance to both Public Safety Canada and the RCMP in addressing these issues.

5.49 Recommendation. In addition to the study of Forensic Laboratory Services currently being conducted by Public Safety Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, in partnership with Public Safety Canada, should examine all national police services to determine whether different delivery models could provide a better service in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

The RCMP’s and Public Safety Canada’s response. Agreed. The RCMP and Public Safety Canada agree that an examination of all national police services is appropriate to determine whether different delivery models may be more efficient and effective. The RCMP’s National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative, along with the results of the Forensic Laboratory Study, will support the actions identified in the response to Recommendation 5.23 and will provide the foundation for future deliberations and discussions surrounding possible delivery options.

Delivering national police services

Timely response remains a challenge despite improvements

5.50 In our April 2000 and May 2007 chapters, we found that the Forensic Laboratory Services did not deliver services in a timely manner. We reported that these delays had a negative impact on investigations and resulted in increased investigation costs. In our May 2007 follow-up audit, we found some improvements, such as the introduction of turnaround time targets. However, we also found that, for the most part, the turnaround targets were not met and that clients lacked the opportunity to influence how Forensic Laboratory Services were provided.

5.51 Previous audits had also noted weaknesses with the timely processing of fingerprints and criminal record updates. In our April 2000 and March 2004 chapters, we recommended that the RCMP establish turnaround targets and implement a solution to deal with its fingerprint and criminal record update backlogs. The RCMP agreed with these recommendations. In later follow-up audits, we noted that while satisfactory progress had been made in implementing some of these recommendations, certain backlogs remained and were increasing.

5.52 Since then, the RCMP has introduced a number of initiatives to improve the timeliness of service delivery for some of these services. This audit focused on four specific services: Forensic Laboratory Services, the National DNA Data Bank, Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services, and Criminal Intelligence Service Canada. We examined whether the RCMP is complying with agreed to service levels in the delivery of its national police services.

5.53 Forensic Laboratory Services. The RCMP has made progress in addressing deficiencies in its Forensic Laboratory Services and in providing clients with an opportunity to influence lab services (Exhibit 5.4). In 2008, the RCMP developed the forensic investigation process to improve service through a more flexible and efficient intake process in order to meet the needs of investigators in a timely manner. As part of planning for the new process, the RCMP undertook client consultations to determine users’ needs and has engaged users throughout the implementation to validate the new model. It is currently in the third step of a four-step implementation and has found that the new process has already decreased backlogs and processing times.

5.54 Based on our testing, we found that while the average forensic lab processing time increased from 66.1 working days in 2007 to 73.9 working days in 2008, the average processing time decreased to 57.5 working days in 2009. For 2010, we found that the average processing time had decreased to 37.5 working days, which supports the RCMP’s assertion that processing times have decreased since using this new process.

5.55 National DNA Data Bank. The RCMP was mandated by legislation to maintain a National DNA Data Bank. We found that the data bank did not have formal service standards; however, turnaround times are tracked in order to identify areas of delay.

5.56 A DNA service request requires the services of both the National DNA Data Bank and the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services as it is not permitted under the DNA Identification Act to identify a DNA sample without a corresponding criminal record. Exhibit 5.8 illustrates how the identification process works.

Exhibit 5.8—The DNA sample identification process involves the National DNA Data Bank and the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services

Flow chart

[text version]

Source: Adapted from the National DNA Data Bank Annual Report

5.57 We tested a sample of files where a DNA sample had been identified, and found that, on average, it takes 9.2 working days for the National DNA Data Bank to initially process a DNA sample. This is consistent with the turnaround times reported by the RCMP. The sample is then searched against existing profiles, which can take much longer in order to obtain a match.

5.58 The search time is dependent on some factors that are beyond the RCMP’s control. For example, DNA from a crime scene cannot be matched unless there is a corresponding profile on record or criminal events happen that yield more information, such as a sample taken from a subsequent crime scene months after an initial crime generates a match. RCMP officials indicated that the waiting time for this match could be years, or that a match may never be identified. Once a match is found, it then takes Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services, on average, 12.3 days to complete the work and return the results to the client.

5.59 Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services. We continue to find delays with updates to criminal records. These records are maintained by the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services. In our March 2009 chapter, we reported that although the backlog for checking fingerprints against the database of existing fingerprints had been eliminated, a backlog remained in updating individuals’ criminal record information. This backlog has worsened. Since the 2005–06 fiscal year, the outstanding criminal record update backlog has increased from 186,018 pages (each criminal record contains one or more pages of information) to more than 1.4 million in 2010 (Exhibit 5.9). The estimated time to process a criminal record update is 14 months for English updates and 36 months for French updates.

Exhibit 5.9—Criminal record update backlog has more than quadrupled since the 2005–06 fiscal year

Line graph

[text version]

Source: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

5.60 We undertook a review of a representative sample of files to determine how long it takes to process a new criminal record and to update an existing criminal record. For a new record, the average time to process was 27 working days. This is significantly higher than the optimal response time of two hours that the RCMP expects to achieve upon completion of the Real Time Identification project. For updates to existing criminal records, we found that only 30 percent of the files originally selected as part of our sample had been completed, with the remaining 70 percent in different stages of the process. For the files that had been completed, we found that the average time to update an existing criminal record was 334 working days. RCMP officials explained that this delay results from significantly increased demand. The RCMP expects to achieve a response time of 24 hours for an existing criminal record update upon completion of the Real Time Identification project.

5.61 As reported in our March 2009 chapter, the Real Time Identification project was supposed to help reduce the criminal record update backlog. At that time, the RCMP indicated that the project was progressing well and was on budget. However, the project is no longer on schedule and was on hold at the time of our audit pending a review of its scope. Therefore, progress toward the implementation of the Real Time Identification project is unsatisfactory (Exhibit 5.10). Accurate, up-to-date criminal records and fingerprints are crucial to Canada’s law enforcement. In previous reports, we noted that Canada’s fingerprint and criminal history records system were unable to keep up with demand and recommended that the RCMP implement a solution. The Real Time Identification project was proposed to improve the efficiency of Canada’s national fingerprint repository (phase 1) and criminal record repository (phase 2).

Exhibit 5.10—Progress in addressing our recommendations on the Real Time Identification project

Recommendation Progress
The RCMP and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada should give priority to implementing the Real Time Identification project.

(Recommendation 3.109 of the 2004 March Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 3, National Security in Canada—The 2001 Anti-Terrorism Initiative)

Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory—Progress is satisfactory, given the significance and complexity of the issue, and the time that has elapsed since the recommendation was made.

Unsatisfactory—Progress is unsatisfactory, given the significance and complexity of the issue, and the time that has elapsed since the recommendation was made.

5.62 In 2005, the RCMP received additional funding in the amount of $99.7 million and allocated a further $30 million of its existing resources to fund the project, for a total of $129.7 million. Delays and complexity impacted the timely delivery of phase 1. As reported in our March 2009 Status Report, phase 1 was concluded in September 2008, 21 months later than planned.

5.63 Phase 2 was scheduled to begin in the fall of 2006, but did not start until February 2008. However, issues from phase 1 remained unresolved and affected the progress of phase 2. An independent review of the project was undertaken in January 2010 due to the ongoing difficulties in deciding on the project scope, as well as cost overruns and schedule delays. The results of the review led to a decision by the RCMP to issue a stop work order for phase 2 on 25 May 2010, until further notice, to reassess the project scope, timeline, and funding. At the time of our audit, the project was still on hold, and the RCMP was in the process of revising the project scope.

5.64 Criminal Intelligence Service Canada. Part of Criminal Intelligence Service Canada’s mandate is to ensure timely production and exchange of criminal information and intelligence products. The Automated Criminal Intelligence Information System (ACIIS), managed by Criminal Intelligence Service Canada, is the Canadian law enforcement community’s national database for criminal information and intelligence on organized and serious crime. It facilitates the sharing of criminal intelligence between law enforcement agencies. In 2008, Criminal Intelligence Service Canada undertook a review of ACIIS, including consultation with law enforcement personnel and intelligence analysts from all levels across Canada. It was determined that deficiencies in the existing ACIIS were eroding trust in the system and creating doubts as to its value. The review also found that the system is cumbersome, requiring manual data re-entry of information already contained within police forces’ own local systems. Where law enforcement resources are stretched, there is insufficient time and resources to duplicate efforts by entering the same information into two systems.

5.65 ACIIS also offers limited analysis capability. For Criminal Intelligence Service Canada, sharing information is essential in its strategy to fight organized crime. The total number of ACIIS information transactions has doubled between 2006 and 2008. Criminal Intelligence Service Canada told us that the current ACIIS system will soon no longer be supportable. Criminal Intelligence Service Canada estimates that an upgrade to a new criminal intelligence system will cost more than $70 million. No source of funding has been identified to meet this need.

5.66 Despite improvements made in some areas of national police services, timely responses to client requests remain a challenge and the backlog for updating criminal records has increased since our March 2009 Status Report. Demand has continued to increase (Exhibit 5.11) and proposed changes to the DNA Identification Act have the potential to further increase the number of service requests to be processed each year. Combined with existing financial pressures, this increase in backlogs and service requests is straining the RCMP’s ability to continue delivering national police services in a timely manner.

Exhibit 5.11—Client service requests continue to increase

Service Fiscal year
2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10
Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services Criminal requests 753,687 880,475 967,440 916,267 972,865 930,790
Civil requests 194,782 199,161 212,240 245,055 242,088 241,894
National DNA Data Bank 17,429 19,048 19,613 19,822 40,733 42,879
Forensic Laboratory Services 11,387 11,746 11,415 11,291 11,752 12,618
Source: Compiled by the Office of the Auditor General using data provided by the RCMP

5.67 In addition to the absence of any legal requirement for police forces to provide or share most criminal information, these increases in backlogs and processing delays limit the RCMP’s ability to provide assurance that its various national police services’ repositories, such as fingerprints, criminal records, and organized crime intelligence, are complete and up to date. Much work remains to be done to resolve these backlogs and delays.

Conclusion

5.68 National police services provided by the RCMP are valuable to the Canadian criminal justice system. They support the national coordination of activities and information through the delivery of specialized training as well as technological and scientific services that ensure a uniform level of public safety and the administration of justice to all Canadians, particularly where such services may not be within the resources of provincial and territorial jurisdictions.

5.69 The RCMP has made satisfactory progress in providing its partners and clients with opportunities to influence national police services, priorities, and service standards. However, specific services still do not provide such an opportunity, while the National Police Services Advisory Council does not include partner representation.

5.70 Despite a commitment to do so, the RCMP has not made satisfactory progress in implementing recommendations regarding the timely delivery of national police services from our 20002004, and 2007 reports. While the RCMP has improved the timely delivery of some of its national police services, it still faces increased backlogs and delays in the update of criminal records. Technological upgrades to critical national police services systems such as the Real Time Identification project either face significant challenges or are being delayed. This increases the risks of loss or delays in the timely transmittal of critical criminal information that could affect the safety and security of Canadians.

5.71 The federal government has not made satisfactory progress in implementing our 2000 recommendation to reach agreements with partners on national police services requirements, funding arrangements, and accountability. The absence of formal agreements creates uncertainties regarding national police services roles and responsibilities of the RCMP and its partners in deciding which national police services should be provided; how these services should be funded; and how provincial, territorial, and municipal partners should be engaged within the national police services governance framework.

5.72 We found that the RCMP has been challenged to continue paying for the rising costs of national police services. The increasing scarcity of unspent funds in other areas to cover financial shortfalls in national police services could affect the RCMP’s ability to deliver these services along with its other obligations. The RCMP has begun to take action by assessing existing financial pressures and then examining and identifying opportunities for permanent reallocation of resources. However, the development and successful implementation of this or any other approach in dealing with funding shortfalls will first require a clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the RCMP and its partners in deciding which national police services should be provided, what their costs are, and how they should be funded.

About the Audit

All of the audit work in this chapter was conducted in accordance with the standards for assurance engagements set by The Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants. While the Office adopts these standards as the minimum requirement for our audits, we also draw upon the standards and practices of other disciplines.

Objectives

The objective of our audit was to determine whether the federal government and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) have made satisfactory progress in implementing selected recommendations from Chapter 7 of our 2000 April Report, Chapter 3 of our 2004 March Report, and Chapter 7 of our 2007 May Report.

Scope and approach

Our audit covered the planning, management, and delivery of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s national police services as provided by Policing Support Services. The audit scope for our examination of the criteria regarding compliance to service levels focused exclusively on the following national police services:

  • Forensic Laboratory Services
  • National DNA Data Bank
  • Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services
  • Criminal Intelligence Service Canada

The remainder of the audit examined all national police services.

The audit team interviewed staff from the RCMP, mostly senior management and analysts from Policing Support Services and the various national police services. Other personnel interviewed included representatives from the Chief Information Officer and Chief Financial Officer branches.

A statistically representative sample of 57 records was randomly extracted from the population of 97,492 completed National DNA Data Bank records in the scope of our audit, with a date range from April 2007 to September 2010. Only records that matched Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services entries during the same date range were included as part of the audit sample. This sample is sufficient to conclude on the sampled population with a confidence level of 90 percent, and a confidence interval of +10 percent, 19 times out of 20.

New and updated records were sampled separately from the fingerprint and criminal record system, with a date range from April 2007 to September 2010. New records are those that did not match any existing fingerprint or criminal record, while updated records are those for which matches have been found. Separate statistically representative samples of 59 updated records and 60 new records were randomly extracted from the population within the scope of our audit of 227,019 updated and new records. Both samples are sufficient to conclude on the sampled populations with a confidence level of 90 percent, and a confidence interval of +10 percent, 19 times out of 20.

Sampling was not performed on the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) database for Forensic Laboratory Services. Rather, all measures were calculated on the entire population in the scope of our audit, which consisted of 103,658 service requests, filtering out those that were either case management, case receipt, or queued entries. The date range for the sample was from April 2007 to September 2010.

Specific audit questions were also directed to Public Safety Canada for its role in developing appropriate national policies for new and evolving crime and border issues and in contract negotiations with provinces and territories for national police services, and the Department of Justice Canada for its role in the preparation of proposed amendments to the DNA Identification Act, which may have a bearing on costs and service levels.

The audit did not examine the performance of provinces and territories.

Criteria

To determine whether the federal government and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) have made satisfactory progress in implementing selected recommendations from Chapter 7 of our 2000 April Report, Chapter 3 of our 2004 March Report, and Chapter 7 of our 2007 May Report, we used the following criteria:
Criteria Sources

The RCMP has legislation in place that gives it authority and responsibility for the delivery of national police services.

  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, section 18
  • DNA Identification Act, section 5
  • Firearms Act, section 81.2
  • Sex Offender Information Registration Act, sections 13 and 14
  • Order Transferring from the Canadian Firearms Centre to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police the Control and Supervision of the Canadian Firearms Centre
  • Agreements between the federal government and provincial and territorial governments affecting national police services
  • Policing services agreements between the federal government and provincial and territorial governments (contract policing)
  • Treasury Board decisions

National police services funding is aligned with legislation and supporting authorities and arrangements.

  • Various appropriation acts
  • Treasury Board decisions pertaining to national police services
  • Agreements between the federal government and provincial and territorial governments affecting national police services
  • Policing services agreements between the federal government and provincial and territorial governments (contract policing)
  • Common Services Policy, sections 5.6 and 5.7, Treasury Board, 2006

The RCMP complies with legislated, regulated, and agreed-to service levels in the delivery of national police services.

  • Service Standards: A Guide to the Initiative, Treasury Board, 1995
  • Quality and Affordable Service for Canadians: Establishing Service Standards in the Federal Government—An Overview, Treasury Board, 1994

Management reviewed and accepted the suitability of the criteria used in the audit.

Period covered by the audit

With the exception of the criteria regarding authority to deliver, for which the audit period started with events leading to the January 1966 Federal–Provincial Conference of Attorneys General on Organized Crime, the period audited for this chapter is from the beginning of the fiscal year 2006–07 until 1 November 2010.

Audit work for this chapter was substantially completed on 1 November 2010.

Audit team

Assistant Auditor General: Wendy Loschiuk
Principal: Gordon Stock
Director: Jean Goulet

Maryanna Basic
John Hilton
Catherine Martin
Nicolette O’Connor
Stacey Wowchuk

For information, please contact Communications at 613-995-3708 or 1-888-761-5953 (toll-free).

Appendix—List of recommendations

The following is a list of recommendations found in Chapter 5. The number in front of the recommendation indicates the paragraph where it appears in the chapter. The numbers in parentheses indicate the paragraphs where the topic is discussed.

Recommendation Response
Governing national police services

5.23 Public Safety Canada, in consultation with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, should work with partners to identify what national police services are required; to examine issues related to governance, accountability, and funding of national police services; and to propose a way forward for implementation. (5.17–5.22)

Public Safety Canada’s and the RCMP’s response. Agreed. Public Safety and the RCMP recognize that, due to the complexity of this issue, a long-term, concerted effort will be required, starting with the study, “A Feasible and Sustainable Model for Forensic Services Delivery in Canada,” commissioned by Public Safety Canada. It is further recognized that, in order to sustain national police services in the future, agreement needs to be reached with partners on what services are required, and that issues related to governance, accountability, and funding need to be addressed. These issues are directly linked to the significant work required to address the other recommendations within this audit, including

  • identifying the services offered as part of national police services;
  • undertaking an analysis that includes cost to deliver the services; what has been funded; cost recovery efforts to identify gaps; the governance structure, which would include the ongoing study on alternative service delivery models and the RCMP’s strategic discussion paper, and consultation with the provinces and territories;
  • developing options and outlining next steps for consideration by the government; and
  • negotiating funding arrangements with partners.

Overlapping with this study would be the RCMP’s National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative that is intended to provide an overall view of the delivery of national police services.

5.29 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police should ensure partner representation in all national police services that best meets the needs of the users of these services. (5.24–5.28)

The RCMP’s response. Agreed. The RCMP agrees that partner representation is important in all national police services in order to best meet the needs of the users of these services. A strategic discussion paper is expected to be completed by the end of the 2010–11 fiscal year, as part of the National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative. This initiative will examine the existing national police service governance structure to understand the current situation and articulate viable options for delivery of the services.

The intended outcome of this activity is to ensure better partner representation in the national police services governance structure, allowing national police services to best meet their users’ needs.

Funding national police services

5.36 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police should complete as scheduled its National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Project, including a detailed estimate of its transactional costs to provide each national police service, and monitor these costs over time. (5.30–5.35)

The RCMP’s response. Agreed. The RCMP agrees that it should complete the National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative, which is currently continuing as planned. One of the intended outcomes of the National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative is to allow the RCMP to build a more robust and accurate method of costing of services. As well, a strategic national police services discussion paper, to be finished within the 2010–11 fiscal year, will include a review of national police services and their challenges, an articulation of potential options for governance and service delivery models, and recommendations for a long-term strategic vision. The discussion paper will be used as a vehicle to engage partner agencies in discussions concerning the future of national police services.

5.49 In addition to the study of Forensic Laboratory Services currently being conducted by Public Safety Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, in partnership with Public Safety Canada, should examine all national police services to determine whether different delivery models could provide a better service in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (5.37–5.48)

The RCMP’s and Public Safety Canada’s response. Agreed. The RCMP and Public Safety Canada agree that an examination of all national police services is appropriate to determine whether different delivery models may be more efficient and effective. The RCMP’s National Police Services Renewal and Sustainability Initiative, along with the results of the Forensic Laboratory Study, will support the actions identified in the response to Recommendation 5.23 and will provide the foundation for future deliberations and discussions surrounding possible delivery options.

 


Definitions:

Contract policing—Policing services provided by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police under contract to certain provinces, territories, municipalities, and First Nations reserves. (Return)

Biology casework analysis agreements—Agreements whereby the federal government and the provinces agree to share the costs of biology casework analysis (DNA) arising from criminal investigations of designated offences in the provinces. (Return)

Service standard—The measurable level of service that clients can expect to receive under normal circumstances (for example, answer telephone calls within two minutes). (Return)

 

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