Upcoming reports

Upcoming audits

Find topics and dates of upcoming reports to Parliament, Northern Legislative Assemblies, and Crown corporations. Click on the triangle for more information about these upcoming audits. Information is regularly posted / updated. Please note that audit topics and dates are subject to change.

Performance Audits of Government Services and Programs

Report titles
Anticipated publication: 2022
COVID‑19 Vaccines

Entities: Health Canada, National Research Council, Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Services and Procurement Canada

Context
The goal of Canada's COVID‑19 immunization response is to enable as many Canadians as possible to be immunized as quickly as possible against COVID‑19, while ensuring that high risk populations are prioritized.

On behalf of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), Public Services and Procurement Canada was responsible for leading negotiations and finalizing agreements with suppliers of COVID‑19 vaccines. Health Canada needed to authorize the vaccines before they could be allocated and distributed by PHAC to the provinces and territories. Together, PHAC and Health Canada are responsible for monitoring the use of vaccines.

Audit Objective
This audit seeks to determine whether

  • Public Services and Procurement Canada provided adequate procurement support to secure vaccines;
  • Public Health Agency of Canada and Health Canada efficiently provided access to COVID‑19 vaccines; and,
  • the Public Health Agency of Canada and Health Canada’s surveillance of the COVID‑19 vaccine was effective and timely

in order to lower the risk of severe illness, hospitalization, and death from COVID‑19 across Canada.

Audit of Specific COVID‑19 Benefits

Entities: Canada Revenue Agency, Employment and Social Development Canada

Context
On 17 December 2021, An Act to provide further support in response to COVID‑19, also known as Bill C‑2, received Royal Assent. This Act serves to extend or create specific benefits and programs related to COVID‑19. This Act requires that the Auditor General of Canada complete a performance audit of certain COVID‑19 benefits and programs.

The COVID‑19 benefits covered by this audit are the following:

  • Canada Worker Lockdown Benefit,
  • Canada Recovery Benefit,
  • Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit,
  • Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit,
  • Canada Emergency Response Benefit,
  • Employment Insurance Emergency Response Benefit, and
  • Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy.

Audit objective
This audit seeks to determine whether the Canada Revenue Agency and Employment and Social Development Canada, according to their roles and responsibilities, ensured that COVID‑19 benefit payments were accurate, paid to eligible applicants, and undertook timely procedures to recover payments made to ineligible recipients and/or of overpayment.

It also seeks to determine whether the Canada Revenue Agency and Employment and Social Development Canada managed the COVID‑19 programs efficiently and measured their administrative effectiveness. It will also examine whether programs’ objectives were achieved, and provided value-for-money outcomes.

Report titles
Anticipated publication: 2023
Commentary on the 2018–2022 Performance Audits of Crown Corporations

Between April 2018 and May 2022, the Office of the Auditor General of Canada conducted performance audits of the management practices of 20 Crown corporations. We reported on each of these audits, called special examinations, to both the Crown corporations and Parliament.

The purpose of this commentary report is to provide a summary of our assessments and to highlight some of the more frequent weaknesses observed in the common corporate management systems and practices of the Crown corporations that we examined.

Visit our website for a list of recently audited Crown corporations.

Benefits Delivery Modernization

Accessible Transportation for Persons with Disabilities

Entities: VIA Rail Canada IncorporatedInc., Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, Canadian Transportation Agency

Context
In the context of the Canada Transportation Act, the term “disabilities” means any impairment or a functional limitation that, in interaction with a barrier, hinders a person’s full and equal participation in society.

The Accessible Canada Act passed in 2019 with the intention of creating a barrier-free Canada by 2040 through the proactive identification, removal, and prevention of barriers to accessibility wherever Canadians interact with areas under federal jurisdiction.

Audit objective
This audit seeks to determine whether VIA Rail, the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, and the Canadian Transportation Agency, identified and removed existing barriers and worked towards preventing transportation barriers for persons with disabilities.

Connectivity in Rural and Remote Areas

Entities: Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Context
In Fall 2018 the Office of the Auditor General of Canada tabled in Parliament an audit on Connectivity in Rural and Remote Areas and found that accessibility to broadband high-speed Internet continues to lag behind for communities in rural and remote areas.

In Budget 2019, the government made a commitment to connect all Canadians to reliable high-speed Internet. This commitment came with an additional $1.7 billion in new funding. In total, the government is delivering up to $6 billion in investments to connect all Canadians. Canada's Connectivity Strategy, also released in 2019, is the government's plan to coordinate these investments to ensure a connected Canada across multiple initiatives.

Audit objective
This audit seeks to determine whether Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission have improved the accessibility, affordability, and quality of high-speed Internet and mobile connectivity for Canadians in rural and remote areas.

Combatting Cybercrime

Systemic Racism

Centre Block Rehabilitation

Entity: Public Services and Procurement Canada

Context
The Centre Block building and the Peace Tower are undergoing rehabilitation construction work to incorporate contemporary functional and operational requirements. This includes alterations to address seismic integrity, physical security, and the renewal of all base building systems. Improvements to elements of accessibility and environmental sustainability will also be addressed. In addition, construction is underway to expand the Visitor Welcome Centre (completed in fall 2018) to build the Parliament Welcome Centre.

Audit objectives
To determine whether Public Services and Procurement Canada has effectively managed cost, schedule, and scope of the Centre Block Rehabilitation Program while balancing the requirements of Parliament, the heritage character of the building, sustainability, and equitable access for parliamentarians and the public.

To determine whether Public Services and Procurement Canada, in cooperation with key partners and stakeholders, put in place a governance framework to support timely decisions for the Centre Block Rehabilitation Program.

Increasing Effectiveness of International Assistance

Antimicrobial resistance

Buying the Canadian Surface Combatant

Housing for First Nations on Reserves

Processing Immigration Claims

Youth Employment and Skills Strategy

Environmental and Sustainable Development Audits

Report titles
Anticipated publication: 2023
Discretionary Powers to Protect Species at Risk

Entities: Environment and Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada

Context
The Species at Risk Act is a key piece of federal legislation that deals with the protection and recovery of wildlife species at risk in Canada. The act enables the federal government to recommend action in the form of a federal safety net or emergency order to the Governor in Council when warranted. This may occur when the Minister of Environment and Climate Change forms the opinion that the laws of the provinces and territories do not effectively protect wildlife species or their critical habitat, or when a species is facing an imminent threat to its survival or recovery.

Audit objective
This audit seeks to determine whether Environment and Climate Change Canada, in collaboration with Parks Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, took a timely and evidence-based approach to advising the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to recommend applying the safety net and emergency order provisions of the Species at Risk Act.

Climate-Related Financial Risks

Entities: Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada

Context
Climate change presents an important challenge to financial institutions from a risk management perspective.

The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada is a federal government agency that regulates and supervises federally regulated financial institutions and pension plans. With respect to climate change, the role of the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada is to help these institutions and plans be more resilient and prepared for uncertainty related to climate change. This, in turn, contributes to continued public confidence in the Canadian financial system.

Audit objective
This audit will examine whether, according to its roles and responsibilities, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada incorporated climate-related risks into the risk management systems and frameworks for the financial institutions and pension plans it regulates, to contribute to public confidence in the Canadian financial system.

Greenhouse Gas Regulations

Forests and Climate Change

Follow-up Audit on the Recovery of Species at Risk

Audits of Northern Territories

Yukon

Report titles
Anticipated publication: 2023
COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

Entities: Department of Health and Social Services, Department of Community Services, Executive Council Office

Context
In Yukon, about 75% of the population lives in the capital, Whitehorse, and the remainder of the population live in 15 rural communities. These rural communities are geographically remote (1 is accessible only by plane), and they face distinct challenges in accessing health and social services, which are more readily available in Whitehorse or outside of Yukon. It is within this context that the OAG decided to conduct this audit to examine whether vaccine distribution was delivered effectively and equitably to Yukon residents.

Audit objective
To determine whether the Department of Health and Social Services, the Department of Community Services, and the Executive Council Office managed the rollout of the COVID‑19 vaccines in an effective and equitable manner to protect the health and well‑being of Yukon residents.

Northwest Territories

Report titles
Anticipated publication: 2023

Stanton Territorial Hospital Renewal Project

Nunavut

Report titles
Anticipated publication: 2023
Child and Family Services

Entities: Department of Family Services, Department of Health, Department of Human Resources

Context
Nunavut has one of the youngest and fastest growing populations in Canada. The well‑being and safety of these young people, their families, and their communities is especially important in Nunavut because it is a core Inuit value.

Many children and families face social conditions such as food insecurity and a lack of housing. In addition, issues like family violence and misuse of alcohol can stem from the legacies of historical and intergenerational trauma, colonization, and residential schools. These issues put some children and families in Nunavut at risk and in need of child protection and family services.

The number of children and youth receiving child protection services is increasing, but maintaining capacity and retaining employees to deliver these services is a challenge in Nunavut.

This audit will look at key deficiencies that we identified in our 2011 and 2014 audit reports and will study new areas such as guidance and training provided to health care professionals and analyses of root causes.

Audit objective
This audit seeks to determine whether the Department of Family Services and the Department of Health, with the support of the Department of Human Resources, provided services to protect and support the well-being of vulnerable children and youth and their families in accordance with legislation, policy, and program requirements.

COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

Entities: Department of Health; Department of Executive and Intergovernmental Affairs; Department of Community and Government Services

Context
Inuit living in remote communities in Nunavut could have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, as many in the population struggle with poor health and social outcomes related to colonization and intergenerational trauma. Pre-pandemic challenges of severe overcrowding in homes, housing, water, and food insecurity, along with a chronic shortage of healthcare workers to deliver essential care, were identified as risk factors to the spread and severe health outcomes of the virus. Vaccination efforts in Nunavut also needed to take into consideration Inuit vaccine hesitancy due to the historical context of colonization and subsequent historical racist healthcare policies and practices. It is within this context that the OAG decided to conduct this audit to examine whether vaccine distribution was delivered effectively and equitably to Nunavummiut.

Audit objective
To determine whether the Department of Health, the Department of Executive and Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Department of Community and Government Services of Nunavut managed the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccines in an effective and equitable manner to protect the health and well-being of Nunavummiut.

Audits of Crown Corporations

Crown Corporations
Anticipated publication: 2023

Royal Canadian Mint

Canadian Museum of History

Laurentian Pilotage Authority